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Here’s a sample reflective essay shared from .

REFLECTIVE ESSAY EXAMPLES RELATED , , , , , , , , , , , ,

None of these answers, quite obviously, is the right one for every class or every teacher. The important point here is that a course's learning objectives condition should every choice which the instructor makes during the planning, operating, and evaluation stages of a course. Writing a reflective essay on one's own teaching--whether in the form of a statement of teaching philosophy or a longer essay--helps teachers to determine the extent to which they are sufficiently coordinating their student learning objectives and their classroom practices. Explicitly spelling out your student learning objectives, moreover, can actually increase student learning in your class, because once you have articulated those learning objectives to yourself you will more effectively and more clearly articulate them to your students.

"Twelve Angry Men A Reflective Essay on Human Natureand Its Influence on Juror #4's and..."

A student writing a reflective essay.

As George Mason University suggests, a reflective essay's purpose must be clear and the points must be organized to help the reader follow the argument. Just because it's personal doesn't mean it should meander like our thoughts. For a piece to be rhetorically persuasive and satisfying, it must have a clear structure, with a beginning introducing the topic and an end concluding it. Authors often believe that if an essay is personal, it does not need an argument. To the contrary, for an essay to work, reflective or not, the author must be able to identify what the essay is about and what it hopes to accomplish. Organization is the greatest tool in communicating that purpose and making it effective. Many authors rely on a chronological scheme to organize the paper, but many other methods of organization are possible and may help make the topic richer and more memorable.

In a reflective essay, the writer captures an image of his own mind.

Every type of essay written in the academic world will always come with a structure that gives it proper organization like the . The same thing is obtainable in writing on reflective essay topics. There is a format you must follow when you write them. You have to start your work with an introduction. This is where you will give a sort of overview of the entire essay. Here, you should explain the subject matter of the reflective essay and the experience you have had prior and after the event being reflected upon. This should be followed by the body of the essay. This is where you explain your opinion and beliefs about the happening in different paragraphs. This should be about three or more paragraphs, and it is meant to give full details of the event. You must make a connection as to how the event has affected you in a personal manner. The body should also be filled with progressions of the proceedings of the event in a very logical manner. The main function of the logical progression is to ensure that your thoughts are transmitted to the reader in a way he will understand. Here, you should give your own opinions about the event in a very strong voice, so that your beliefs are projected towards the establishment of the conclusion you will arrive at later in the essay.

reflective essay examples  Source:


Reflective essays are usually written at the completion of a milestone. For instance, a scientist may write a reflective essay at the completion of an experiment or a student may be asked to write a reflective essay at the end of a course of study or the completion of an individual or class project.In most reflective essays, as well as describing what went right, you'll also want to describe what went wrong or what could be improved and how. For instance, in the example you might describe attractions you didn't visit that you would like to see and/or side trips that disappointed you and why. Alternatively, you might describe things you packed that you didn't need and things you didn't pack that you wished you had brought with you.An essay on “My Summer Vacation” could be a reflective essay. However, a reflective essay is not to be confused with an informative essay. While an informative essay relates facts like where you went, what you did, and how much things cost, a reflective essay is an evaluation. It's a record of your feelings and findings from the beginning of your experience until the end. In addition to concluding with a summary of your subject, the conclusion to a reflective essay usually also includes what you learned from the experience.Below we offer two examples of thoughtful reflective essays that effectively and substantively capture the author's growth over time at California State University Channel Islands (CI). We suggest that you write your own essay before reading either of these models-then, having completed your first draft, read these over to consider areas in your own background that you have not yet addressed and which may be relevant to your growth as a reader, writer, or thinker.The most important factor to remember in writing a reflective essay is that your opinions and conclusions should directly relate to the experiences you examine in the essay body.It may be hard to write a type of essay for the first time. If this is your first time to write a personal reflective essay, you can refer to the reflection essay example below.The easiest way to define a reflective essay is to think of it as a type of writing that covers an individual experience of the writer. So what does that mean? Well, it means the essay uses an experience the writer has had to reflect on. Reflective essays usually analyze this and they can even discuss future goals that might occur as a result of the experience.Let me guess, you were assigned a reflective essay writing assignment for one of your classes. Did you professor even bother to give you an example of a reflective essay? Did your professor tell you what it will take to get a good score on your paper or show you an actual A grade paper? Also, did they even explain or cover what a reflective essay is? If you answered no to any of these, then how in the world can you even attempt to write your reflective essay without knowing the answer to these questions.

In my experience, writing a paper in most classes is like trying to drive a car with a blindfold on. The professors leave everything up to interpretation, every professor has their own grading scale, and it is simply not possible to determine what the professor expects. If you allow this to happen you are literally left trying to guess what the professor expects and wants you to write. Would you attempt to take a test without knowing what sections and topics you will be tested on? Then why do we attempt to write papers without knowing this information.

When you look at it like that it might make you re-consider your options. So what can you do about it? First of all, if the professor does not provide this information then ASK. What is the worst that can happen? Email your professor and ask them to send you a previously graded A paper. If that is not an option then ask them how it will be graded, what they will look for, or ask for an example or a sample reflective paper. Also, you may even get a lot more information from your professor than you ever imagined just by simply asking simple questions. Some professors enjoy what they do and they get excited when students show interest in what they are doing. Often times they will go out of there way to help you if you make yourself stand out from the pack by asking the right questions.